Category Archives: Collective

Inspired

We had a lot of fun with our last pot-luck poem and, to our surprise, Maria Shriver (who turns out to be a poetry fanatic) even posted a link to our video on her Twitter page and called it “powerful.” Some of you wanted us to organize this again, so the virtual poetry is back!

Add your line to our collective poem, given the theme of inspiration, by posting a word, phrase, or lines (please do not exceed 3 lines) below as a comment reply to this post.

As with last time, we’ll compile all the lines into one piece and post it next week. And, as you requested, poet Tiffany Okafor will be back to read the piece in an accompanying video.

So, tell us about inspiration…

About The Editresses

In light of all the interviews that we have done, some folks were surprised that Kathryn and I had not shared more about ourselves. So, we finally decided to interview each other. Here, Kathryn and I discuss our backgrounds, current work, and of course, what living unchained means to us.

KATHRYN BUFORD

You are studying sociology. Why did this subject matter interest you?
Sociology, simply put, is the study of society and the local and global communities and forces that shape it. Also, as a social science, many sociologists conduct experiments and develop theories to better understand social issues. So, I think everyone is a sociologist really—everyone has tried to make sense of the world and how they fit in it and why.

I became interested in sociology because I had a strong understanding of social injustice and inequality at an early age. I thought sociology might help me understand the social processes and problems I was seeing better…I think it has.

You are studying sociology. Why did this subject matter interest you?

Professor Delores Aldrige

I have SOOOO many opinions about this. If there were and audio button that I could insert here, you would hear me screaming: YESSSSSS!!!! Many black female sociologists are concerned with issues of race, class, gender and sexuality.

They have been strong advocates of the feminist “personal as political” concept, which explains that the discrimination that individuals experience in private spaces cannot be separated from their public interactions. Black female sociologists were also important in popularizing the concept of intersectionality—the idea that our race, class and gender identities, for example, cannot be separated.

Two important women in this regard are professors Delores Aldrige and

Black Feminist Thought by Patricia Hill Collins

Patricia Hill Collins. Let me say that what I admire about both of them is that they have acknowledged the black women who have come before them and are creating spaces for more black female voices. Delores Aldrige’s, Imagine a World: Pioneering Black Women Sociologists discusses the important contributions of black women to the field of sociology and academia, in general.

As for Patricia Hill Collins, I’ll try not to say too much about what she means to me because there simply aren’t enough words (maybe a million would get me halfway there…). Perhaps, her most recognized work is Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment —I read this book and it became a part of me. I am so grateful and honored to have her as an advisor. I see so much consistency between her words in Black Feminist Thought and how she approaches the discipline of sociology and interacts with her students—she doesn’t want to be idolized, she wants her work to stand for something and liberate minds. She makes me proud to be a part of this profession. (By the way, her nickname for me is “Miss Thing”).

Most importantly, both of these women have incorporated their knowledge into their activism; they have fought and risked a lot for their beliefs—they were truly unchained. I think many black women sociologists bring the field back to its roots as a discipline that aimed to not only make sense of society, but to better it. Sociologists in this camp include Harriet Martineau, W.E.B. DuBois (love him!) and Karl Marx who famously stated: “Philosophers have only interpreted the world, the point, is to change it.”

What does living unchained mean to you?
Some women live in societies where it is dangerous, even deadly to speak honestly about the way they see and understand the world. So, for those of us who can share, why would we take our voices and talents for granted? Living unchained means living with an awareness of the world around us and knowing women’s voices in it matter—deserving respect and an audience.

Living unchained also means being true to yourself and not waiting for things to be perfect or having something that someone says you need to have to act or speak your truth. Anna Julia Cooper did not earn her PhD in sociology from the Sorbornne until she was 66. She had gone most of her life sharing her social analysis and critique without having a formal titled that said she was “qualified.” I think that many women are waiting or simply have chosen not to speak because someone discouraged us; we don’t think we’re good at it, we haven’t studied it, we don’t want to be misunderstood. So we kill our potential, we bury our creative voices. Living unchained means coming back to life and squeezing all of the juice out of it. I don’t think I’m there yet, but I’m know I’m getting closer with every blog post, every dance, every tear.

MIRIAM MOORE

What do you do when you’re not working on Live Unchained? Is there anything else you like to do creatively?
When I’m not working on Live Unchained I’m often working on other design projects either for clients or myself. Digital media is my primary tool for creating art, but I also enjoy taking out my camera or paints and pencils and working in those mediums as well. Sometimes I find that I can take elements of those creative experiments and bring them into my graphic design.

What made you interested in graphic design? What do you like about it?
As a teenager I took a graphic design class and was hooked. Back then I hardly knew what graphic design was, but I loved how it merged technology and creativity, and I wanted to learn more about it.

There are many things I like about graphic design. As a designer I love to help my clients realize a vision. Many of my clients need logos or marketing materials for businesses they started or projects they are a part of. It is great to create a sharp logo to show of their business or develop marketing materials that help to more clearly articulate their message.

As society and technology changes, so does graphic design. It is a communication tool that has the ability to bring across important messages when used responsibly. I like responsible and thoughtful graphic design because of its utility and beauty.

Do you have any advice for people interested in graphic design or creating digital media?

Graphic design can be beautiful and it can be seductive as well. It is important for designers to be responsible and conscious of what they produce and put out in the environment. Graphic design can be just as effective in selling cigarettes as it can be in selling the idea of quitting. Make sure you take the opportunities when they arise to create something meaningful.

Can you share some examples of your work?
Sure, I’d Love to! In addition to the pieces seen below, my design work can also be viewed at: www.miriammooredesign.com.

Also, I just started a blog: www.miriammoore.wordpress.com, where I will show work that is not on my website. It is sparse now, as it is just getting started, but stay tuned! I would love to receive feedback from the live unchained family.

BOOK JACKET RE-DESIGN- I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS: In this jacket re-design I experimented with using type as image to create the birdcage imagery, and included paint elements in the piece as well.

PEZ WALL GRAPHIC- PROJECT FOR EBAY CAMPUS: Ebay wanted a fun wall graphic for their toy themed building. To create this wall graphic each PEZ dispenser had to be shot individually with a high resolution camera and photoshopped to fit seemlessly into the auditorium image. This image shows the final wall graphic.

ROCK TIMELINE - PROJECT FOR EBAY CAMPUS: To maintain a varied and fun environment for their employees, E-Bay has several buildings on their campus each with a different theme. This poster was a large wall poster for the music building on that campus.

JAZZ TIMELINE - POSTER FOR EBAY CAMPUS To maintain a varied and fun environment for their employees, E-Bay has several buildings on their campus each with a different theme. This poster was a large wall poster for the music building on that campus.

What does living unchained mean to you?
Living unchained is allowing yourself to create and speak your truth honestly and freely.

Spare a line?

Because our two favorite “ivities” are collectivity and creativity, we wanted to invite you to a special gathering…

A potluck poem is a poem that is created collectively by a group of people who take turns sharing words. We would be so honored to have you join us by sparing a line or two and posting it in the comments section below this post as Miriam and I have.

The theme is freedom–so share whatever line you think speaks to this. Most importantly, you should feel free when you write. Don’t worry about what someone else wrote or think too much about what you should say–just share and we will love you. =)

We will post the poem, in its entirety, on Monday, March 8th as one document to be downloaded from this site. The final collective piece will be read and recorded by one of our contributors and posted as a video blog the following week.

Happy writing!

The next part is a creative opportunity for our contributors with a poetic spirit and access to YouTube or Vimeo. Learn more at our contests page.

She was Saartjie: Jessica Solomon Shares The Saartjie Project

Sara Baartman became popularly known as the “Hottentot Venus” throughout Europe in the 19th century.

Many black women have been exposing her story, drawing connections between her experiences and their own, as well as identifying her by a different name–Saartjie.

Jessica Solomon, along with other founding artists, formed The Saartjie Project, a Washington D.C. based performance collective to honor Saartjie’s experience.

In this interview, Jessica explains Saartjie’s history, why she started the collective, the attention it has received and why Saartjie’s story is so significant and relevant to black women today.

What is the Saartjie Project?

Wow. I always get a little stuck when asked this question because there are so many layers!

We are a tribe of creative women willing to stretch our own boundaries and those imposed on us.

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